RADIANCE BLOG

Category: Trends and News

DU’s Keystone Strategic Plan leads to action

 

The 20th century model of delivering a liberal and creative arts education is inadequate to the task of developing graduates who can think broadly and critically in and out of their chosen fields.

—From the Keystone Strategic Plan 2018-2025

 

We are thrilled to celebrate the creation of the College of Arts, Humanities & Social Sciences at the University of Denver.

The creation of the College is a direct result of their strategic planning process. The exciting Keystone Strategic Plan commits the college to nothing less than the transformation of the liberal and creative arts education in alignment with the University’s transformation under DU IMPACT 2025.

 

What role will the social sciences, arts, and humanities play in a world that increasingly operates through artificial intelligence, the internet of things, and big data? A very important one. The careers and lives of tomorrow will be defined by distinctly human qualities such as ethical judgment, creativity, adaptability, agility, and storytelling.

—From the Keystone Strategic Plan 2018-2025

 

“This plan represents the best of our strategy work at Corona. We are thrilled with the resulting plan and look forward to the momentum and positive changes it creates for the students, staff, faculty, and alumni of the college,” said Karla Raines.

Read the full press release here. See the video that DU produced about the plan below.


Aging in Wyoming

Earlier, we reported on a joint project that we conducted with Heinrich Marketing to examine the different ways that Wyoming youth move into adulthood.  Today we’ll look at the other side of the spectrum, examining how Wyoming residents age.

We examined the timeline by which different life events happen among older adults, including retirement, health issues, losing one’s spouse, and other issues.  We ultimately developed a timeline of these events to better understand how – and when – older adults face life changes that are associated with aging.

Check out the abridged version of our presentation here (pdf).


Adulting in Wyoming

Working with our partners at Heinrich Marketing, we recently prepared an analysis of the “adulting” process for young people in Wyoming.  We were curious about the timing and acceptance of various traditional indicators of adulthood, such as having kids, pursuing a full-time career, and others.  There are many models of being an adult based on these traditional indicators, so we examined 32 different models to see which was the most common in the state.

Check out the abridged version of our presentation here (pdf).

And stay tuned – soon we’ll post another presentation on Aging in Wyoming.


There’s No Place Like Home

Photo by Matt Collamer on Unsplash

If you have walked through downtown Denver recently, you know that it is hard to miss the growing homeless population. Civic Center Park has become a meeting place for many in the homeless population—a place where they can gather to share stories, food, and cell phones.  Each year, Denver conducts a “Point in Time” (PIT) survey that aims to count the number of people experiencing homelessness. The US Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) conducts an annual Point-in-Time (PIT) survey to track the rate of homelessness across the nation. Individual cities are responsible for collecting the data, with assistance from Local Homeless Coalitions, and provide the data to HUD, as well as publish a local report. In Denver, the Metro Denver Homeless Initiative oversees the PIT survey. The 2018 Denver PIT survey found that 5,317 people are experiencing homelessness in the city and county of Denver, competing for a total of approximately 1,000 emergency shelter beds (MDHI 2018). This number is up from the PIT count of 3,336 homeless persons in 2017.

Over time, the city of Denver has taken various approaches to “solving” the issue of homelessness. In 2003, the Denver Department of Human Services published a report titled “A Blueprint for Addressing Homeless in Denver” which outlined a ten-year action plan aimed at ending “chronic homelessness in Denver that will also address homeless prevention and the enhancement of services for populations with special needs” (Denver Homeless Planning Group 2003: 4). In 2005, Proclamation 53 was signed by then-mayor John Hickenlooper, expressing official support for Denver’s Road Home program—an initiative to secure housing for the city’s homeless population. Despite these, and other, city initiatives the homeless population in Denver continues to grow and housing costs surge past national averages. While the numbers may seem bleak, one Denver non-profit has followed the path laid out by other major cities such as Seattle, WA and Austin, TX and searched for an innovative solution. This solution came in the form of tiny houses.

Tiny homes burst onto the scene in the early 2000s. Small, sometimes mobile, homes with sleek designs offered a minimalist housing solution to people seeking a break from the materiality of the modern world. In Denver, tiny homes are now being used to provide a safe housing solution for some of Denver’s homeless population. Beloved Community Village, located in Denver’s River North (RiNo) district, consists of 11 tiny homes, housing up to 22 people. The self-governing community opened in July 2017, operating as a 180-day pilot project. In January 2018, Beloved Community Village was forced to relocate after their six-month lease with the Urban Land Conservancy expired. Luckily, the community was able to relocate only 200 feet away onto another property owned by the Urban Land Conservancy. Unfortunately, the Urban Land Conservancy and the city of Denver have only officially approved another 180-day lease agreement for the tiny house village, leaving the permanency of Beloved Community Village in question.

According to Beloved Community Village website, the village’s purpose “is to provide a home base and safe place for those who are presently in Denver and have no other place to live. With this collection of secure and insulated homes, we provide a viable solution in the midst of the current housing crisis.” While Beloved Community Village has been successful thus far in living and embodying their purpose, one has to wonder whether the tiny home model can be expanded to accommodate even more homeless residents in the Denver-metro area and throughout the state of Colorado. In May 2018, the organization behind Beloved Community Village, the Colorado Village Collaborative, revealed they are actively working to open another tiny home community at St. Andrew’s Episcopal Church in downtown Denver. The new village will have eight tiny homes, designated specifically for women and transgender homeless residents.

Affordable housing remains a crucial need in Denver and across the nation, as housing costs continue to rise and wages continue to stagnate. Cities and towns must face this problem head-on and work to understand how and why their communities are affected in order to develop strategies and initiatives to tackle homelessness. Homelessness is only one problem though and does not exist in isolation, thus cities need to ensure they understand the greater context and vulnerabilities unique to their community. The issues involved span everything from zoning laws and development to population growth and migration to mental health and criminal justice services. In 2016 and 2017, Corona Insights conducted a needs assessment for the city of Longmont. The research found that some of the greatest needs facing community residents are the ability to find affordable housing options and in turn, paying for housing. Furthermore, between 2010 and 2014, the availability of rental properties with a monthly rent below $800 decreased by 33%. The completion of the needs assessment and its subsequent report in Longmont equipped the city government with knowledge to better meet the human service needs of their residents.

Homelessness is a pervasive issue in many urban centers and rural areas across the country, with no end in sight. Local governments and non-profit organizations both have roles to play in addressing homelessness. Communities and organizations interested in addressing homelessness may benefit from commissioning a community needs assessment to uncover systemic challenges in their local area, and committing to enact changes informed by the assessment findings.  Armed with information and compassion, we can begin to dismantle the barriers that lead to homelessness. The time is now.


Virtual Natives

Hello virtual native, good-bye digital native.

While that statement might seem far-fetched, after all it wasn’t that long ago that we were getting used to the idea of a digital native as a person familiar with computers and the Internet from a very young age, it isn’t too early to plan for a future defined by virtual reality. Children born over the next two decades will grow up with it. Not only will these children grapple with developing their own imaginations, they’ll be discerning what is really real from what is virtually real. Might the 2 year-old of 2030 have a virtual imagination?

It’s time to get ready. Parents, care givers, educators and children’s museums will be shaped by this new reality.

You read it here first. Virtual native – a person familiar with virtual reality from a very young age.


Measuring Reactions to Your Ideas

Market research can be painful sometimes.  You may have poured your heart and soul into an idea and feel it’s really good, only to put it in front of your customers and hear all the things they hate about it.  But it’s better to know in advance than to find out after you’ve spent a ton of money and risked your brand equity for your idea.

It may not be as sexy as measuring customer satisfaction, prioritizing product features, or helping you optimize your pricing strategies, but sometimes market research is simply necessary to make sure that you haven’t overlooked something important when developing a product, service, or marketing campaign.  No matter how much we try to put ourselves in the shoes of our customers, it is impossible to be 100% sure that your own background and experiences have ensured that you fully understand the perspectives of customers who come in a huge variety of shapes and sizes.

In our own work, we frequently work with advertising agencies to help inform and evaluate ad campaigns and media before launch.  Considering the enormous amount of money required to reach a wide audience (though television, radio, online ads, etc.), it just makes sense to devote a small part of your budget to running the campaign by a variety of people in your audience to make sure you know how people might react.

In some cases, what you learn might be fairly minor.  You might not have even noticed that your ad lacks diversity.  You might not have noticed that your ad makes some people feel uncomfortable.  Or perhaps, your own world view has given you a blind spot to the fact that your ad makes light of sensitive issues, such as religion, major tragedies, or even date rape.

Unfortunately, we saw an example of this issue in Denver recently, where a local coffee chain’s attempt at humor infuriated the local neighborhood with a sign that read, “Happily gentrifying the neighborhood since 2014.”  From the perspective of someone less engaged in the neighborhood, you can understand what they were getting at – that good coffee was a sign of progress in the natural development of a thriving city.

However, the statement completely misses the fact that gentrification often results in people being forced from the homes they have lived in for years and the destruction of relationships across an entire neighborhood.  In this particular case, the coffee shop was located directly in the middle of a neighborhood that has been struggling with gentrification for the past decade or more, and tensions were already high.  The ad was like throwing gasoline on a fire and has resulted in protests, graffiti, and even temporary closure of the store.

It’s certainly easy to blame the company, the ad agency, and anyone else that didn’t see that this campaign would be a bad idea.  However, the reality is that all of us have our blind spots to sensitive issues, and no matter how much we feel like we understand people of different backgrounds, there will always be a chance you’ve missed something.

So, please, for the sake of your own sanity and those of your customers, do some research before you launch a marketing campaign.  At a minimum, run your ad by some people who might see it just to see how they react.  And if you want a more robust evaluation of your campaign, which can help to ensure that your advertising dollars have the biggest impact possible, we can probably help.


Human Experience (HX) Research

About a year ago, I stumbled upon a TEDx Talk by Tricia Wang titled “The Human Insights Missing from Big Data”. She eloquently unfurls a story about her experience working at Nokia around the time smartphones were becoming a formidable emergent market. Over the course of several months, Tricia Wang conducted ethnographic research with around 100 youth in China and her conclusion was simple—everyone wanted a smartphone and they would do just about anything to acquire one. Despite her exhaustive research, when she relayed her findings to Nokia they were unimpressed and expressed that big data trends did not indicate there would be a large market for smartphones. Hindsight is 20/20.

One line in particular stuck out to me as I watched her talk— “[r]elying on big data alone increases the chances we’ll miss something, while giving us the illusion we know everything”. Big data offers companies and organizations plentiful data points that haphazardly paint a picture of human behavior and consumption patterns. What big data does not account for is the inherent ever-shifting, fickle nature of humans themselves. While big data continues to dominate quantitative research, qualitative research methods are increasingly shifting to account for the human experience. Often referred to as HX, human experience research aims to capture the singularity of humans and forces researchers to stop looking at customers exclusively as consumers. In human experience research, questions are asked to get at a respondent’s identity and emotions; for instance, asking how respondents relate to an advertising campaign instead of just how they react to the campaign.

The cultivation of HX research in the industry begs the question: what are the larger implications for qualitative research? Perhaps the most obvious answer is that moderators and qualitative researchers need to rethink how research goals are framed and how questions are posed to respondents to capture their unique experience. There are also implications for the recruiting process. The need for quality respondents is paramount in human experience research and will necessitate a shift in recruiting and screening practices. Additionally, qualitative researchers need to ensure that the best methodology is chosen in order to make respondents feel comfortable and vulnerable enough to share valuable insights with researchers.

Human experience research may just now be gaining widespread traction, but the eventual effects will ultimately reshape the industry and provide another tool for qualitative researchers to answer increasingly complex research questions for clients. At Corona, adoption of emerging methodologies and frameworks such as HX means we can increasingly fill knowledge gaps and help our clients better understand the humans behind the research.


Ugh, Millennials

Is anyone else tired of talking about millennials? Millennials have seemingly been on everyone’s mind, with many worrying over their spending habits, charitable giving, large debt, voting behaviors, and other things. Why do we care so much about this generation? Don’t they already have a problem with entitlement and being all about “me me me”; we probably shouldn’t feed into that, right?

Pictured: Gregory (myself) the Millennial
Fun fact: depending on where you draw the line, 70% of Corona staff are classified as millennials.

As annoying as it might be, there are some very good reasons to focus on the millennial generation. The baby boomer generation is now on the decline and currently there are 11 million more millennials. It is estimated that millennials will comprise over a third of adult Americans by 2020,  up to 75% of the American workforce by 2025, and currently account for over one trillion dollars in consumer spending in the U.S. Despite this, millennials have less money to spend and are encumbered with greater debt. Perhaps unsurprisingly, the conclusion is that millennials are important because they are the new money – they are very quickly becoming the largest group of consumers and are therefore greatly impacting all businesses and organizations.

The millennials, as a generation, share some commonly seen characteristics:

… and the facts don’t end there. If you haven’t already, I highly encourage you to pour over some of the linked materials to familiarize yourself with this impactful generation. If they haven’t yet, millennials will be disrupting your organization sometime in the near future, and it’s inescapable that we all need to adapt.


Welcome to the consumer era: When engagement drives change

It’s inescapable. Every day I see more and more examples of it. Consumer behavior is at the core of sweeping industry change. Too often we get caught up in thinking about technology as the disruptor and forget that people are at the heart of the transformations all around us. Here are four examples from this past week:

  • Sears. J.C. Penney. Bebe. Macy’s. Target. Kohl’s. Neiman Marcus. And that’s just for starters. The epic decline of department stores and apparel-focused retail is linked to Amazon’s domination of the online marketplace. At the heart of that change? Consumers who expect something more – and something different. Increasingly, consumers are saying no to the traditional retailer and shopping mall. What do they demand? Convenience, cost and a user-defined experience.
  • Who would have thought that consumer choice would lead colleges to guarantee that their degree will get you a job – and a job with a decent salary? As college students – and their parents – increasingly question the return on investment given staggering student loan debt, higher ed is having to respond creatively to compete for students. Both educator and student take on the risk – and reap the reward.
  • Decades of tradition are on the chopping block as movie studios  plan to release films to online platforms mere weeks after release to theaters. As reported in the Wall Street Journal yesterday, movie companies have experienced declining home entertainment revenues for 2 years straight and global box-office growth has also been slowing. In a quest to increase revenues they are looking to meet consumers where they are – in the comfort of their home on a tablet, pc or tv.
  • And lastly. Bruce Springsteen. We are experiencing the beginning of the end of rock and roll as we’ve known it. Boomer rock stars became global corporations in the days when record companies invested in them like R&D. That era is over. The concert business is bifurcating into festivals and small venues as consumers expect more intimate and novel experiences. No longer satisfied with paying high prices for poor sound quality and a miniscule view of the band, consumers are pursuing other entertainment options. Today’s young stars will build careers in an entirely new era. Welcome to Me, Inc. rock and roll style.

Each of these stories has a common denominator – consumers demand the experience on their terms. They define the where, when, how and how much. These changes are sweeping and have only begun. The question now is, who is next?

What will this mean for other industries and sectors?


State of Our Cities and Towns – 2017

For many years, Corona has partnered with the Colorado Municipal League to conduct the research that is the foundation of their annual State of Our Cities and Towns report. CML produced the following short video, specifically for municipal officials, about the importance of investing in quality of life:

Learn more, view the full report, and watch additional videos on the State of Our Cities website.