RADIANCE BLOG

Category: Colorado

Colorado Media Project

If you’d like to learn more about how Coloradans access arts and culture, and how the news media interacts with the arts, we’ve got some good news for you.  The Colorado Media Project has been working Colorado Public Radio, Denver, and Rocky Mountain Public Media to study these issues (with support from the Bonfils-Stanton Foundation and Gates Family Foundation), and Corona Insights was part of the team. 

We conducted a large statewide public survey that’s chock full of interesting information.  You can go here to learn more and to read our report on the topic, as well as the results of a community listening project conducted by Hearken, a firm that develops engagement strategies for newsrooms.


Colorado Population 2040: 4 Trends to Watch

As we celebrate our 20th anniversary of impactful work for purpose-driven organizations in Colorado, we look towards the future by envisioning what the state of Colorado will look like in 20 years. Building on the thinking, research, and analysis we’ve conducted through our work with organizations like the Children’s Museum of Denver at Marsico Campus for their 2030 master planning process and utilizing data and projections from the Colorado State Demography Office, check out 4 key trends to note for the future population of our state.

Photo by Daniel Norris on Unsplash
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The Many Lands of Colorado

As we begin a blog series about Colorado, we must first take note of the diversity of the state.  We have mountains, plains, and valleys, of course, but we also have large metro areas and small towns, agricultural economies and service economies, and myriad other variations on the Colorado theme.  The concept of “Colorado” is very different depending on where you are in Colorado.

After 20 years of working in Colorado demographics, I’m always intrigued to see how different organizations break out the state into regions for their work.  There are some strong patterns the regional analyses I’ve seen over the years, but there are always variations.  What is the overall pattern, though?  If we had to come up with a consensus set of ten regions, what would they be?  I decided to try to find out.

I found regional breakouts of Colorado that have been produced by a dozen large organizations or programs around the state. Those organizations divided the state into anywhere from 4 to 13 regions [1], all on a county-level basis.

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