RADIANCE BLOG

Category: Community

Denver Data Storytellers – Blended Storytelling Strategies

As data storytellers, we’re often charged with the task of revealing useful and hard-hitting data in a manner that is cohesive and captivating. Sharing data in a meaningful way is difficult and blending different types of data together can make it even more challenging.

Great visualization tools for quantitative data have made it easier to share quantitative findings. However, it is important to remember the value that qualitative data bring, and the importance of highlighting participant or customer voice. This event will explore how qualitative and quantitative findings can be effectively blended to tell a more interconnected, nuanced, and comprehensive story. We will highlight real-life examples from research in the private and public sectors. Your presenters include:

  • Kate Darwent – Director, Corona Insights
  • Molly Hagan – Associate, Corona Insights
  • Caitlin McAteer – Associate, Corona Insights

This event will be hosted on July 15th from 12 – 1 pm. Register here.


Corona’s Commitment

Our communities are hurting. As we reach the 14th day of protests here in Denver against police brutality and systemic racism, the Corona team has been listening, learning, and reflecting.  

Photo by Henry Desro on Unsplash

We mourn with our Black, Indigenous, and People of Color (BIPOC) neighbors and friends at the injustices they face at the hands of systems that oppress them. This is a reckoning moment for our country, as we collectively acknowledge that our country’s history is one characterized by systemic racism and oppression; that we live in a country built by Black bodies through Black oppression and Black death. Children have different opportunities in life simply because of the zip code into which they were born. Data can predict a person’s life span based on his or her ethnic identity—this disparity is one of many symptoms of a system in need of revision.  

In our work, inequity of ethnic and sexual minorities consistently presents stories of worse public health outcomes, access to resources, opportunities for advancement, and the ability to participate in research due to the time and access to technology or transportation that this requires. Like everyone, Corona researchers are imperfect humans with our own blind spots that we have been inspired to recognize and address. Members of our staff have been active in the community, re-educating ourselves on the realities of minority experiences in our own communities, and engaging in honest conversations with our coworkers, friends, family, and neighbors.   

At Corona Insights, our roles as researchers, evaluators, and consultants are vital because we are a window of communication between leaders and the public, and we are an advisor to those leaders.  As a company, we prioritize uncovering the truth for the good of all, and this includes engaging the community, lifting up the voice of the underserved, and identifying structural barriers to equity. 

We do not believe in simply checking boxes: we are getting to work. As an organization, we are deepening our efforts to listening, learning, and acting with equity. We understand that delivering on promises of equity and justice will require ongoing work and steadfast commitment. Earlier this year, our team formed an equity task force. As one result of this initiative, Corona Insights is hiring a Colorado-based diversity consultant to create an actionable plan for how Corona Insights can further embrace and express an equitable perspective in our work.  

We will emphasize the importance of this present moment in history.  

We will take pride in stating clearly that Black Lives Matter.  

We will listen. We will learn. We will grow.  


Community and Research: Making the Case for a Nuanced Understanding

Photo by Park Troopers on Unsplash

What is community? We hear the word thrown about in a multitude of contexts and meanings, but what is it really? The Oxford Dictionary defines community as a “a group of people living in the same place or having a particular characteristic in common.”  But how are we defining and identifying those commonalities? 

When quarantine lockdown began in Colorado in March 2020, I posed a question about community on social media. I asked how people were defining community during coronavirus. It is a rare phenomena for the global “community” to simultaneously share a common experience. I wondered if community was being thought of in a new way during these unprecedented times.  

Somewhat surprisingly, many of the responses provided by personal and professional acquaintances did not speak of a larger, global community. Rather than using expansive terms, many spoke of communities on a hyper-local scale. Their current community was being defined by their family, their coworkers, the local restaurant owners and hospitality workers.

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Ideas for How to Help Your Community

Photo by Nina Strehl on Unsplash

One of the things that really stuck with me from school is research on helping behavior. There’s a lot of cute research out there showing that humans, from a young age, have a strong inclination to help others. Even animals will help other animals. Rats will help other rats, even if they do not interact with them and even if they have to give up chocolate! Right now is a really strange time for many of us. If you’re like me, you are a nonessential employee who can work from home. I know the best thing I can do for others right now is to follow social distancing guidelines. But I just feel a strong desire to help, like we all do in an emergency, so I’ve been trying to find creative ways to help support my community and those who don’t have the luxury of staying at home. Here are some ideas we’ve run across.

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