The Lifesavers Conference

As with any industry, it is important in market research to keep up with the latest thinking and practices by regularly attending workshops and conferences.  For this reason, members of the Corona staff can occasionally be found at conferences put on by the American Association of Public Opinion Research (AAPOR), Market Research Association (MRA), and American Marketing Association (AMA).  However, here at Corona, we have an additional challenge of keeping up not only on the latest and greatest research practices, but also on the issues most important to our clients.  For that reason, we also try and occasionally make an appearance at conferences focused on subject matters such as parks and recreation, traffic safety, and more.

Kevin Presenting @ Lifesavers Conference

In March of this year, Kevin and I made the trip to Chicago to participate in this year’s Lifesavers Conference.  This conference has been conducted annually for decades and brings together individuals from around the country whose jobs are dedicated to keeping Americans safe on our nation’s highways.  The minds present at these conferences have been instrumental at making changes both legislatively and in communications with the public to dramatically reduce traffic fatalities over the years, including laws aimed at requiring child safety seats and punishing drunk drivers, and communications aimed at increasing seat belt usage, reducing impaired driving, and more recently, reducing distracted driving.

The things we learned at this year’s conference were enlightening to say the least, and it would require a whole series of blog posts to cover them all.  However, a few highlights included:

  • Learning about how state traffic safety departments are effectively using social media to reach a new generation for whom traditional television advertising simply isn’t effective.
  • Learning about how small nonprofit organizations can conduct their own evaluations to make the case to funders that their work is making a true impact.
  • Understanding the efforts being made by law enforcement in Colorado and Washington to keep drivers safe in the age of legalized marijuana.

This year’s conference was particularly special for us, as Kevin had the opportunity to present the results of research we conducted with the Minnesota Office of Traffic Safety aimed at better understanding some of the characteristics of high-risk drivers (those who exhibit a combination of risky traffic behaviors, including drinking and driving, speeding, texting while driving, and not wearing a seat belt).  A few of the key findings of that research included:

  • High risk drivers tend to overestimate how common their behaviors are among their peers (drinking and driving isn’t near as common as one might think), overestimate their own driving ability (almost everyone believes they are “above average”), and underestimate the risk of their driving behaviors (those who speed regularly are considerably more likely to be in a crash than those who do not).
  • Those who text and drive know they shouldn’t and worry about being in an accident, but they do it anyway. (Another presentation at the conference suggested that texting and driving should be treated as an addition rather than a rational decision.)  On the other hand, those who speed regularly are relatively unlikely to think their behavior is a problem and are more worried about getting a ticket than being in a crash.

Overall, the conference was a great chance to catch up on some of the things going on in traffic safety and lend our own expertise as well, so we hope we have the opportunity to attend again in the future!


Total Trivia Crack Scores by Game and Duration – The final post is a series of blogs analyzing Trivia Crack

We looked at total Trivia Crack scores in our previous blog of this series, and now we’ll close up by delving a little bit deeper.  Because, you see, not all Trivia Crack games are the same.

In our methodology section (Blog 4 of this series), we made a comment that players in one-on-one games tend to have higher scores than players in challenges.  Let’s take a look at that comparison.  (These graphs are also mathematically smoothed to enhance readability.)

Challenges vs One on One Scores

We can see that Challenge gamers are far more likely to have scores below approximately 390, while One on One gamers are more likely to have scores in the 410 to 430 range, and far more likely to have scores in the 460 to 490 range.  Interestingly, you’re more likely to encounter the elite players with scores over 490 in Challenge games, which runs counter to the pattern.

Overall, the median score for Challenge gamers is 411, while the median score for One on One gamers is 434.  This is a pretty big difference, because it means that the average One on One gamer is scoring about 4 points higher in each of the six categories.

And as we close out our analysis of Trivia Crack, we’ll take one final look at stamina.  If you’ve made it through all nine blogs in this series, you’re probably interested in that.

In our fourth blog on methodology, we examined how scores change as people answer more questions.  Our competing theories were that more frequent players may have higher scores because they’re good at the game and having fun, or they may have lower scores because it’s hard to maintain consistent high scores over time.  In that blog, we showed that scores actually tend to be higher as players answer more questions, rising approximately 6 points (1 per category) for every 1,000 questions answered.  So our theory was proven that stronger players play more often.

But actually, both theories are true.  When we examine the score distribution, we find that players are much less likely to have elite scores as they answer more questions.

The three smoothed curves below show the distribution of scores of players who have answered differing numbers of questions per category, with the yellow bar showing the most frequent players and the gray bar showing the newer or less frequent players.  If you look at the far right side of the graph, you’ll note that we had no frequent players in our sample who scored more than a 495, while a small percentage of our newest players did.  While it may be a statistical fluke it would appear that it’s difficult to maintain an ultra-high score as one plays more and more games.

If that’s the case, though, why do we see average scores rise as more games are played?  The answer may lie in two places on the graph.  First, we can take a look at the middle (blue) bar of those who have answered between 1,000 and 2,000 questions per category.  These people are quite strong, with a notable percentage having scores exceeding 490.  And second, we can see in the most veteran players (yellow bar) that a goodly proportion are well above average, with scores ranging from 460 to 490.

Questions Answered per Category

And with that, we conclude our examination of the game of Trivia Crack.  If you want to challenge me, look me up at @kevin.802.562 and we’ll make a game of it.  But I have to warn you, we take the “Bright Thinking, Brilliant Guidance” motto seriously at Corona Insights, so be prepared for a battle.


Total Trivia Crack Scores – The eighth in a series of posts analyzing Trivia Crack

In our previous six Trivia Crack blogs, we’ve taken a look at each of the individual categories as well as talking a bit about the methodology of collecting and analyzing scores.  Now let’s move on to the capstone of our little Trivia Crack project, which is a look at total scores.

We calculated total scores by simply adding the scores of each of the categories together.  Here’s the distribution that we saw.  Note that this graph includes a smoothing algorithm or otherwise it would be incredibly jagged and hard to read.

Total Scores Graph

From the above graph, we see that it takes a score of 393 to rank about 25 percent of Trivia Crack players, and a total score of 425 to rank in the top half.  The top 10 percent of players are scoring 477 or higher, and if you want to be a 1 percenter you’re going to need a 505 or higher.  Good luck!

If you’d like to know exactly where you stand, you can check out the following table for exact scores.

Table of Exact Scores

Alright, it’s time for that final blog post. Let’s dig a bit deeper into these scores by game and duration.


The Arts Category – The seventh in a series of posts analyzing Trivia Crack

Arts is our final individual Trivia Crack category to analyze, and the seventh blog in our series.  We’ll have two more blog posts after this where we look at total combined scores for all categories, so stay tuned!

Arts is the bane of many a player, and is far and away the toughest category.  Let’s take a look at scoring patterns in this realm of painting and literature.

As usual, we gathered and analyzed the scores of over 400 random Trivia Crack players by participating in both one and one and group challenges.  Here’s the distribution of scores that we developed.

Arts Category Scores

Arts is definitely the toughest category overall.  It only takes a score of 59 to beat 25 percent of scores, and a score of 66 will put you in the top half of Arts contestants.  This is much lower than we see in other areas.  A score of 77 will put you in the 90th percentile, which is also the lowest of all the categories.  At the top end of the scale, it only takes an 83 to land in the top 1 percent.  So a lot of people are scoring lower in Arts than in other categories, and relatively few people also have high scores.

So how do Arts scores compare to other categories?    On average, it’s players’ weak link of the six categories.  Arts is the top category for only about 1 percent of players, and it’s the worst category for a whopping 42 percent.  If Arts is your best category, you’re a rare species.

Arts Rank Compared to Other Categories

If you’re good at Arts, does that predict that you’re a good overall player?  And if you’re weak at Arts, are there other categories where you’re strong or weak?  We did a correlation to test that analysis.  We won’t reveal our analysis of total scores until our next blog, but we can look at correlations.

First off, we should note that there’s a strong correlation between every category and total score.  We would expect that, because your total score is just the sum of all of your individual category scores.  However, there’s a stronger correlation in some categories than others, and Arts is a pretty strong predictor of overall score.  It has a Correlation factor of 0.899, where 0 means no relationship at all and 1 means that it’s a perfect predictor.  This is the third-strongest correlation among the six categories, which means that your Arts score is a very good indicator of your total score.

And what category most closely aligns with Arts?  Another simple correlation analysis shows that the scores that run most closely in parallel to Arts scoring is Geography scoring, but it doesn’t particularly stand out among most of the other categories.  What does stand out is the low correlation with sports scores.  I guess you should expect to see a lot of people in hockey jerseys at your local art museum.

Correlations of Category Scores

If you’d like to know exactly where you stand on Arts, here’s a chart that estimates the proportion of players who score at or above a particular score, based on our modeling.

Score Modeling

Now let’s finally take a look at the total scores. 


The History Category – The sixth in a series of posts analyzing Trivia Crack

History is our fifth Trivia Crack category to analyze, and the sixth blog in our series.  Let’s take a look at scoring patterns in this tough category.

We gathered and analyzed the scores of over 400 random Trivia Crack players by participating in both one and one and group challenges.  Here’s the distribution of scores that we developed.

History Category Scores

History is clearly a challenging category.  It only takes a score of 63 to beat 25 percent of scores, and a score of 70 will put you in the top half of Entertainment contestants, which is lower than the figures that we’ve seen in other categories so far.  But you need a 83 to break the 90th percentile, which is higher than most of the other categories we’ve seen so, and it takes an 89 to land in the top 1 percent.  So more people have low scores in history compared to most other categories, but more people also have high scores.  This category therefore sees a broader spread of scores than most categories.

So how does History compare to other categories?    On average, it’s a distant 5th.  History is seldom a player’s weakest category, but also seldom the strongest category, and is more likely to rank in their bottom three than their top three.

History Rank Compared to Other Categories

If you’re good at History, does that predict that you’re a good overall player?  And if you’re weak at History, are there other categories where you’re strong or weak?  We did a correlation to test that analysis.  We won’t reveal our analysis of total scores until later – you know, to build up suspense – but we can look at correlations.

First off, we should note that there’s a strong correlation between every category and total score.  We would expect that, because your total score is just the sum of all of your individual category scores.  However, there’s a stronger correlation in some categories than others, and History is a very strong predictor of overall score.  It has a Correlation factor of 0.928, where 0 means no relationship at all and 1 means that it’s a perfect predictor.  This is the second-strongest correlation among the six categories, almost as strong as Geography.  Your History score is therefore a very good indicator of your total score.

And what category most closely aligns with History?  Another simple correlation analysis shows that the scores that run most closely in parallel to History scoring is Geography scoring.  As we noted in our earlier Geography blog, you apparently learn a lot of geography when you learn history, or perhaps vice versa.  Arts also has a high correlation, and as we’ve seen with other categories, Entertainment is typically a different skill set.

Correlations of Category Scores

If you’d like to know exactly where you stand on History, here’s a chart that estimates the proportion of players who score at or above a particular score, based on our modeling.

Score Modeling

Art is up next, and it is our final individual Trivia Crack category to analyze.


The Entertainment Category – The fifth in a series of posts analyzing Trivia Crack

In our series of analyzing knowledge about knowledge, we’ve previously talked about scoring patterns in the Science, Sports, and Geography categories of Trivia Crack, as well as the methodology of collecting our data.  Today we’ll move on to Part 5 of our series, where we examine Entertainment scores.

We gathered and analyzed the scores of over 400 random Trivia Crack players by participating in both one and one and group challenges.  Here’s the distribution of scores that we developed.

Entertainment Category Scores

A score of 71 will put you in the top half of Entertainment contestants, which is lower than the 72 that we’ve seen in other categories.  But you need a 79 to break the 75th percentile, which is higher than most of the other categories we’ve seen so.  And an 87 will put you in the top 1 percent.

Entertainment therefore produces a very unusual pattern.  As seen below, Entertainment is quite often a player’s top category – a full 31 percent are at their best with entertainment questions.  On average, entertainment is the second strongest category, trailing only geography, but for very different reasons.

Geography ranks high because it’s very seldom a person’s weakest category, but Entertainment ranks high because it’s quite often a person’s strongest category, even though there’s a large group of people for whom it’s ranked 5th or 6th.

Entertainment Rank Compared to Other Categories

If you’re good at Entertainment, does that predict that you’re a good overall player?  And if you’re weak at Entertainment, are there other categories where you’re strong or weak?  We did a correlation to test that analysis.  We won’t reveal our analysis of total scores until later – you know, to build up suspense – but we can look at correlations.

First off, we should note that there’s a strong correlation between every category and total score.  We would expect that, because your total score is just the sum of all of your individual category scores.  However, there’s a stronger correlation in some categories than others, and Entertainment is the weakest category as a predictor of overall score.  It has a Correlation factor of 0.774, where 0 means no relationship at all and 1 means that it’s a perfect predictor.  This is still strong, but compared to the other categories we see that there are a lot of people who either “specialize” in Entertainment knowledge or it’s their Achilles Heel.

And what category most closely aligns with Entertainment?  Another simple correlation analysis shows that the scores that run most closely in parallel to Entertainment scoring is Arts scoring, and for the most part there’s not much correlation with other categories.  Our Entertainment experts tend to be out on an island.

Correlations of Category Scores

If you’d like to know exactly where you stand on Entertainment, here’s a chart that estimates the proportion of players who score at or above a particular score, based on our modeling.

Score Modeling

Next up: History trivia.


Measuring Trivia Crack Scores – The fourth in a series of posts analyzing Trivia Crack

If you have been following our series of Trivia Crack scoring analyses, you may be wondering how we developed our estimates.  It’s actually an interesting process, and it plays into our strengths here at Corona Insights, of measuring a population when we can only gather data for a sample.  So let’s take a quick break from the scoring analyses and talk a little about how we did it.

The Challenges of Measuring

Trivia Crack offers six scores for each player, one each for history, geography, science, sports, arts, and entertainment.  Scores range from 0 to 100, and reflect the percentage of questions that a person has answered correctly.  We can also calculate a total score by adding the six scores together.

However, it’s not that easy.  We don’t have access to the master database, and there are four big challenges in measuring scores if your only way of gathering data is by playing the game.

  • First, Trivia Crack provides scores for individuals, but doesn’t provide scores for the whole population. So we had to sample the population by playing games against random opponents.  Lots and lots of games against random opponents.  We gathered data for 432 opponents, which meant that we had access to the answering patterns for more than 440,000 questions.  That part was pretty fun.
  • Second, Trivia Crack is actually two similar games. There’s a one on one matchup against a single random opponent, and there are challenge matches where you play against nine opponents at once.  It’s easier to sample data in the challenge matches because you gather data nine times faster.  But are the players and scores different?
  • Third, we have a classic statistical problem of sample sizes and variance. If you only answer 1 question, it’s pretty easy to get a score of 100.  If you answer 10, it’s more difficult.  If you answer 1,000, it’s almost impossible.  So we needed to be sure that our analysis wasn’t tainted by this fact.
  • And finally, there’s a subtle but important complication. If you start a game and select a random opponent, you’re more likely to draw a person who plays often and has answered more questions.  So when we start a game and randomly draw an opponent, we’re not drawing a true sample of players.  We’re overrepresenting players who play more often.  Those players may have higher scores because they’re good at the game and having fun, or they may have lower scores because it’s hard to maintain consistent high scores over time.  We have to figure this out and statistically correct for it if it turns out that scores are higher or lower for more frequent players.

So How Did We Measure?

First off, we played a lot of games, always against random opponents, and then we entered their scores into a database.  That part was easy.  We also set a rule that we would not include a person’s score in the analysis if they hadn’t answered at least 300 questions.  While somewhat arbitrary as a threshold, this requirement eliminated a lot of the random variation that comes when people answer only a few questions.  We eventually gathered data on 392 players, which was enough to do a strong analysis.

The statistical corrections were a little more complicated.  First, we tackled the issue of the two types of games.  We gathered from both group challenges and individual matchups, and found that there is indeed a difference in scoring.  Players in challenge matches tend to have lower scores, possibly because there’s a time pressure in challenge matches that doesn’t exist in one on one matches.  So we made some statistical corrections to assume that a player splits his or her time evenly between challenge matches and one on one matches.

The last correction is a little more complex.  We did an analysis and found out that the most frequent players tend to have higher scores.  In general, every 1,000 questions answered equates to about a 1 point gain in each of the categories, or 6 points in total.  This can throw our numbers off because we’re more likely to encounter high-frequency players when we draw a random opponent, which will then overestimate the scoring of a typical player.

To correct for this, we statistically weighted our data to account for the fact that more frequent players are overrepresented.  The scores of each player in our database were weighted according to the inverse of the number of questions they’d answered in their Trivia Crack career.  Players who have answered more questions are more likely to be randomly drawn because they play more often, so we weighted them down in inverse proportion to the number of questions they have answered over time.Total Score by Number of Questions Answered

In summary, it’s a more complicated analysis than simply drawing random opponents and looking at their scores.  But we developed some systems to do these corrections, and that made the process easier.  And by the way, kudos to the fellow in our sample who had answered over 12,000 questions per category.

One thing you will notice in all of the category analyses is a bit of a jagged pattern – a sawtooth.  We figure that those would smooth out if we gathered information on a lot more scores, but hey, we have to earn a living.  We can’t just be playing games all day.

So enough about methodology.  Let’s get back to the scoring.

Check out our next scoring analysis, the fun topic of Entertainment questions.


The Geography Category – The third in a series of posts analyzing Trivia Crack

A Study of Trivia Crack Scoring

In our series of analyzing knowledge about knowledge, we’ve previously talked about scoring patterns in the Science and Sports categories of Trivia Crack.  Today we’ll move on to Part 3, where we examine my personal favorite, Geography.

We gathered and analyzed the scores of over 400 random Trivia Crack players by participating in both one and one and group challenges.  Here’s the distribution of scores that we developed.

Geography Category Scores

Like both of the previous categories, half of all Trivia Crack players have a score of 72 or higher in Geography.  But again, we see a different pattern around that median.  Relatively few people are particularly weak at Geography and a lot of people are pretty darn good.   You need an 83 to break into the top 10 percent of scores and an 88 to be in the top 1 percent.

So with Geography we have a new type of category, one where a lot of people are pretty strong and relative few who struggle.  That produces a different profile of rankings.  As seen below, Geography is very seldom a player’s weakest category or even second-weakest.  And while it’s not disproportionately likely to be a player’s top category, there’s a good chance that it’s in their top three.  When you average all of this out, Geography is the highest-ranked category for players.

Geography Rank Compared to Other Categories

If you’re good at Geography, does that predict that you’re a good overall player?  And if you’re weak at Geography, are there other categories where you’re strong or weak?  We did a correlation to test that analysis.  We won’t reveal our analysis of total scores until later – you know, to build up suspense – but we can look at correlations.

First off, we should note that there’s a strong correlation between every category and total score.  We would expect that, because your total score is just the sum of all of your individual category scores.  However, there’s a stronger correlation in some categories than others, and Geography is the most powerful as a predictor of overall score.  If you want to predict a person’s overall rating, the best question to ask them is their Geography score.  It has a very strong Correlation factor of 0.939, where 0 means no relationship at all and 1 means that it’s a perfect predictor.  That’s uncannily high; perhaps a knowledge of Geography is an indicator of well-rounded knowledge?

And what category most closely aligns with Geography?  Another simple correlation analysis shows that the scores that run most closely in parallel to Geography scoring is History scoring.  Perhaps one can’t really understand history without knowing geography, but in contrast one can know geography quite well while not knowing the latest Taylor Swift album.  Geography scoring correlates much lower with entertainment than any other category.

Correlations of Category Scores

If you’d like to know exactly where you stand on Geography, here’s a chart that estimates the proportion of players who score at or above a particular score, based on our modeling.

Score ModelingDon’t forget to check out the next post, where Kevin explains how we’ve developed our estimates.


The Sports Category – The second in a series of posts analyzing Trivia Crack

A Study of Trivia Crack Scoring

In our series of analyzing knowledge about knowledge, we first talked about scoring patterns in the Science category of Trivia Crack.  Today we’ll move on to Part 2, where we examine the exciting world of sports trivia.

We gathered and analyzed the scores of over 400 random Trivia Crack players by participating in both one and one and group challenges.  Here’s the distribution of scores that we developed.

Sports Category Scores

So half of all Trivia Crack players have a score of 72 or higher in Sports, which is the same median that we saw earlier with Science.  But other than that, the pattern is quite different.  We have a lot of people who aren’t strong at sports, so you can break out of the bottom 25 percent with a slightly lower score than in Science, but there are a lot of people who are really, really good at sports.  To break into the top 10 percent you need a score of 83, and the top 1 percent requires a sky-high score of 89.  Whereas an 85 will get you into the top 1 percent in Science, it’ll only get you into the top 5 percent in Sports.

Since we have more people who are particularly strong at sports and more who are particularly weak, where does the Sports category stand in terms of rankings?  As you might expect, it follows a very atypical pattern.  A full 30 percent of Trivia Crack players have Sports as their best category, but for 21 percent it’s their weakest.  Sports is a boom or bust category for players.  Overall, Sports is the fourth-highest category for players.

Sports Rank Compared to Other Categories

If you’re good at Sports, does that predict that you’re a good overall player?  And if you’re weak at Sports, are there other categories where you’re strong or weak?  We did a correlation to test that analysis.  We won’t reveal our analysis of total scores until later – you know, to build up suspense – but we can look at correlations.

First off, we should note that there’s a strong correlation between every category and total score.  We would expect that, because your total score is just the sum of all of your individual category scores.  However, there’s a stronger correlation in some categories than others, and Sports is one of the least powerful as a predictor of overall score.  It’s still strong, with a Correlation factor of 0.791, where 0 means no relationship at all and 1 means that it’s a perfect predictor.  However, it’s only the fifth-highest among the six categories.  Our theory is pretty straightforward on this one:  there are a lot of people who really know sports, but aren’t as strong at other categories, and there are also a lot of people who know little about sports but are well-versed in other categories.

And what category most closely aligns with Sports?  Another simple correlation analysis shows that the scores that run most closely in parallel to Sports scoring is Geography scoring.  Maybe it has something to do with spatial reasoning or something.  If you like watching a ball in the air, you also tend to know the capital of Romania.  On the other hand, Sports scoring correlates least well with Arts, so it’s probably not a great idea to discuss Impressionism with the person sitting next to you at a Cubs game.

Correlations of Category Scores

If you’d like to know exactly where you stand on Sports, here’s a chart that estimates the proportion of players who score at or above a particular score, based on our modeling.

Score Modeling

Now it’s time to check out our next post examining geography trivia.


Knowledge About Knowledge – Trivia Crack Evaluation Measures

A Study of Trivia Crack Scoring

The Science Category – The first in a series of posts analyzing Trivia Crack

If you’ve been online in America over the past few months, you’ve probably heard of the Trivia Crack app.  With estimates ranging into the tens of millions of players, a lot of people enjoy testing their knowledge of facts in six different categories of questions.

If you’ve played Trivia Crack, you know that you get information about your own scoring – the percentage of questions that you answer correctly.  But there’s no easy way to compare that against the rest of the world.  This being America and all, we like to keep score and see how we stack up against others.  So what’s a person to do?

Well, we at Corona Insights have taken care of that for you.  We’re in the business of providing bright thinking and brilliant guidance, so it should come as no surprise that we have a strong interest in facts.  We’ve been doing a lot of (ahem) “field research” in the game, and we now present to you a nine-part series on Trivia Crack scoring.  Welcome to Part 1, and we’ll post additional analyses every few days or so.

First, we should note that the analysis process itself is interesting, because there are some complexities to gathering and analyzing the data that might not be obvious.  We’ll address that in the third blog of this series.  But for now, we know you’re probably here to read about scores, so let’s dive right in.  In our first blog, we’ll talk about the category of Science.

We gathered and analyzed the scores of over 400 Trivia Crack players by participating in both one and one and group challenges against random opponents.  Here’s the distribution of scores that we developed.

Science Category Scores

So half of all Trivia Crack players have a score of 72 or higher in Science, and only 10 percent score more than 80.  If you want to be in the top one percent, you’re going to need an 85.  As we’ll see later, you can break into the top 1, 5, or 10 percent in Science with lower scores than in most other categories.  This means that Science players tend to have a tighter range of points than most other categories.

Now, how good are people at Science compared to other categories?  It may surprise you, but Science is the third-highest category on average.  A lot of people are pretty good at it – it’s the best category for 18 percent of players and second-best for another 24.  But just as important, very few people are really bad at Science compared to their other categories.  It’s the worst category for only 7 percent of people.  We all have a little bit of Isaac Newton in us, I guess.

Science Rank Compared to Other Categories

If you’re good at Science, does that predict that you’re a good overall player?  And if you’re weak at Science, are there other categories where you’re strong or weak?  We did a correlation to test that analysis.  We won’t reveal our analysis of total scores until later – you know, to build up suspense – but we can look at correlations.

First off, we should note that there’s a strong correlation between every category and total score.  We would expect that, because your total score is just the sum of all of your individual category scores.  However, there’s a stronger correlation in some categories than others, and Science is less strong than most as a predictor.  It’s still strong, with a Correlation factor of 0.876, where 0 means no relationship at all and 1 means that it’s a perfect predictor.  However, it’s only the fourth-highest among the six categories.  Our theory is that Science tends to drag down some of the higher-scoring players.

And what category most closely aligns with Science?  Another simple correlation analysis shows that the scores that run most closely in parallel to Science scoring are Arts scoring.  If you’re good at Science, you’re pretty likely to be good at Arts.  But there’s a much lesser relationship with Sports.

Trivia Crack Correlations of Category Scores

 

If you’d like to know exactly where you stand on Science, here’s a chart that estimates the proportion of players who score at or above a particular score, based on our modeling.

Score Modeling

Check out the next post examining the exciting world of sports trivia.